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Alan's Bee Chronicles - Colony Check - All is Well!

My eight year old son joined me to check on our three hives as the weather was sunny and warm enough to check on the queen and the brood. It had appeared over the last 30 days that all three hives were in good health but I wanted to find out for sure. The intention was also to possibly rotate the upper super below as during winter the queen can tend to lay brood in the upper box only where it is warmer. With John helping me gently smoke the bees I was happy to find in the queen in the first hive which was a swarm hive I caught last spring and see that she was laying eggs in the upper section and had capped brood in both the lower and upper super. The honey and pollen stores looked good and there were no signs of mites, nosema, or American foulbrood.

We opened up our second hive to find similar results. We saw the queen, signs of freshly laid eggs and capped brood in both the upper and lower brood chambers. Again the honey and pollen stores looked good and there were no signs of mites, nosema, or American foulbrood. I did get stung on my foot so John took over removing the frames from the hive and putting them back in. He was so gentle with the bees at one point I heard him say to an injured bee “bee down, come here little bee I will help you”. I think he is a bee whisperer at the ripe old age of eight.

Unfortunately, we ran out of time to full inspect our third hive but the signs of a healthy colony were there. I am extremely excited about the health of my bees and believe some of the reasons for success were vinegar and sugar syrup feeding in the fall along with Api Var, plenty of honey and pollen stores for overwintering, dry sugar feeding during the winter. The bees just look so amazingly healthy I am going to have to watch them so they do not build up too fast or I may have swarming tendencies and need to split.My eight year old son joined me to check on our three hives as the weather was sunny and warm enough to check on the queen and the brood. It had appeared over the last 30 days that all three hives were in good health but I wanted to find out for sure. The intention was also to possibly rotate the upper super below as during winter the queen can tend to lay brood in the upper box only where it is warmer. With John helping me gently smoke the bees I was happy to find in the queen in the first hive which was a swarm hive I caught last spring and see that she was laying eggs in the upper section and had capped brood in both the lower and upper super. The honey and pollen stores looked good and there were no signs of mites, nosema, or American foulbrood.

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